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Key Stage 3 English

English: Year 7

Curriculum Leader: Ms Damms/Ms strike

What will your son study?  

Your son will read and respond to a range of texts including novels, classical stories, drama, poetry and non-fiction from a variety of historical periods and cultures. He will develop reading skills to help him infer and deduce, comment on language and structure and explore the writer’s intentions. In addition, he will develop his writing skills to write imaginative and non-fiction pieces for different audiences and purposes. Speaking and listening skills will also be developed throughout the year

  1. Class novel e.g. ‘Two Weeks With the Queen’, ‘Freak the Mighty
  2. Poetry – Gothic poetry e.g. Edgar Allan Poe, Walter De La Mare,
  3. John Keats
  4. Non-fiction – the art of autobiography
  5. Introduction to Shakespeare – ‘Hamlet’
  6. Classical journeys – myths and legends, and Dante’s ‘Inferno’

English: Year 8

Curriculum Leader: MS Damms.Ms Strike (Ms Kerr, KS3 co-ordinator) 

What will your son study?  

Your son will read and respond to a range of texts including prose, classical stories, drama, poetry and non-fiction from a variety of historical periods and cultures. He will develop reading skills to help him infer and deduce, comment on language and structure and explore the writer’s intentions analytically. In addition, he will develop his writing skills to write imaginative and non-fiction pieces for different audiences and purposes. Speaking and listening skills will also be developed throughout the year.

  1. Class novel e.g. ‘Mortal Engines’, ‘A Monster Calls’.
  2. Modern poetry – incl.  Wendy Cope, Valerie Bloom, Sylvia Plath, Norman MacCaig, Ted Hughes, WH Auden
  3. Non-fiction and media (‘Or Lives Now’) – young people’s lives
  4. Short stories (‘Turning-Points and Consequences’) – incl. Ray Bradbury, Roald Dahl, Claudette Williams, Ijeoma Inyama and Oscar Wilde   
  5. Drama and literary heritage – ‘Dracula’, ‘Frankenstein’, ‘Dr Faustus’

English: Year 9

Curriculum Leader: Ms Damms/Ms Strike (Ms Kerr, Ks3 Co-ordinator)

What will your son study?
In Year 9 your son will more explicitly develop the key skills needed for GCSE, including studying some texts that are alternative choices on the GCSE syllabus, though not exclusively so. He will study a range of texts including prose, drama, poetry, non-fiction and media from a variety of historical periods and cultures, with a unit that will look at ‘unseen’ texts from the past. He will develop reading skills to help him infer and deduce, comment on language and structure and explore the writer’s intentions. In addition, he will develop his writing skills to write imaginative and non-fiction pieces for different audiences and purposes. There will also be a strong focus on academic writing in preparation for GCSE. Speaking and listening skills will also be developed throughout the yea

  1. ‘Animal Farm’ and other writing by George Orwell
  2. Poetry and Identity e.g. Sarah Olowofoyeku, George the Poet, Mahmoud Darwish, Daljit Nagra, Simon Armitage
  3.  Shakespeare’s ‘Othello’
  4.  Non-fiction unit (theme of crossing frontiers and journeys) with prose from 19th ­ 21st century
  5.  Bridging unit to GCSE English literature (this was on ‘Of Mice and Men’ in 2015, but our text choice may be changed)

How can you help your son?

One of the most important things you can do is ensure your son has a rich and varied reading life, including fiction primarily, but also other sorts of texts. Talk to him whenever you can about his reading, and yours, take him to a local library to enrol for a reader’s ticket, and make time for library visits. Where you can, please take time to discuss issues with him too, for example current affairs, news stories, cultural events. Aim to make use of London’s free museums and galleries. The V&A museum or the Museum of London are brilliant places to enjoy and to find out about times past and social change, all topics that enrich our reading of English literature and non-fiction. On a more day-to-day basis, please still monitor private reading at home, or ask your son to read aloud if such practice has been recommended by his teacher or if you know it will help boost his confidence. Too often, such practices end far too early. Please do aim to help your son make sensible (and limited) use of computers and games where they are not helpful to his work. Invaluable, too, is building in time to look through his exercise book with him, encouraging him to improve work or act on teacher feedback, or check and correct spellings (which you could help him to learn).